2019 CLC Ride 2 + Flora + Fauna – A Ride Trifecta

So the guys and I had the chance to get in a short two-day ride on Friday/Saturday. I wanted to test my body on a ride of a little greater length and difficulty with weight than last time. It ended up being a bit too much because of the wind, but we still had a nice time. You can see that ride and our qualifying treats for the CLC challenge here:

Eclipse – March Ride 1 – Sense of urgency

The flora and fauna pics are below for the March challenge.

Bike + straw-necked Ibis (plural). I’ve never seen a whole bunch sitting in a tree before. They are often called the ‘farmer’s friend’ because they love to eat grasshoppers and locusts. And there are plenty of those around here today!
Close-up of the ibis.The Straw-necked Ibis is widespread across much of the Australian mainland, and can fly hundreds or thousands of kilometres between temperate locations in the south and tropical areas, as well as between inland sites and the coasts either due to seasonal movements or in response to local environmental conditions.
It has a preference for wet and dry grasslands, pastures, croplands and swamp or lagoon margins. It will often mainly feed on terrestrial invertebrates such as locusts and spiders, but will also take aquatic invertebrates, crustaceans, fish, frogs, small reptiles and small mammals such as mice.
Bike with some gum flowers.
Oh, so you couldn’t see the flowers? Try this close-up. Sadly, I don’t what species this is – probably messmate, but I’m not sure.
Closer still.

Nerdy chick in Australia who loves to ride and is accompanied by the crew: 'The Commander' Verne and the 'Mental Health Specialist' Kermit.

16 response to "2019 CLC Ride 2 + Flora + Fauna – A Ride Trifecta"

  1. By: gregblood Posted: March 17, 2019

    The Feeshko (my wife) is a big fan of heart-shaped rocks. She has an uncanny ability to spot them pretty much anywhere. Same with heart-shaped leaves, hail, potatoes, potato chips, oil stains, bruises, etc.

    I really liked your essay on silence. You’re right, total silence is so rare these days and when you get to experience it, it seems almost exotic, luxurious, alien.

    • By: The Navigator Posted: March 18, 2019

      I think it would be very preferable to be married to someone who found hearts in potato chips instead of Virgin Mary’s and Jesus’s . My parents have a heart rock garden at their place (as they have too many rodents and deer that eat what little plants they can grow with their sub-9 inches of precip each year). There are heart rocks lining pathways at their home, too!

      Yes, absolute silence is absolutely rare. Sometimes even just the crickets ruin it!

  2. By: Scooter Posted: March 17, 2019

    What a great post! I’ve never heard of the straw necked ibis, and had no idea that gum trees went through a flowering phase.

    • By: The Navigator Posted: March 18, 2019

      Most people in Australia are more familiar with the White Ibis. They are so common in urban areas around parks and rubbish tips that they are commonly referred to as bin chickens. The colouring is almost reverse on the straw-neck ibis. Yes, eucalypts flower every 2 or 3 years. Some are much more showy than this one. Some flower in winter; some flower in summer. The flowers can be a variety of colours – not just white.

  3. By: NancyG Posted: March 17, 2019

    Nice flora and fauna post Em. I will take more time to read your blog. I too look for heart shaped rocks ;’-). A fun thing to do. Learned something new — straw neck ibis. Never heard of those either.

    • By: The Navigator Posted: March 18, 2019

      Thanks, Nancy. I’m always looking for rocks that tell a geological story, but I always keep my eye out for heart rocks for my parents 🙂

  4. By: Rich-Illinois Posted: March 17, 2019

    Great blog and photos!
    Looking at that steeper track beyond the campsite — New Salsa is around 90 days away now. 🙂
    Sorry to hear you are having issues with your arm now. 🙁
    I, too, think the the seasons are somewhat out of sync with the calendar — and have been for some time.
    And! . . . . . . .HAPPY BIRTHDAY!!!

    • By: The Navigator Posted: March 18, 2019

      Thanks, Rich. Yes, I’m looking forward to bringing the Salsa home. One of my fears with my shoulder was that it would need surgery before I went to America and then I wouldn’t be allowed to lift anything. So as crappy as the diagnosis is – I’ll still be able to lug the bike back with me 🙂

  5. By: Bill Stone Posted: March 17, 2019

    Hi Em, I hope your arm(s) get(s) better soon. Sounds like we had different diagnoses, but similar symptoms. My bum arm, almost completely useless for many months, eventually regained 90-95 percent of range of motion, but not much strength yet. It’s no fun to endure, but you will probably discover — if you don’t already realize — you’re a very strong and resilient woman.

    • By: The Navigator Posted: March 18, 2019

      Hi Bill – yes, I thought of you when I was getting the xray and consulting the physio. There are certainly a heap of things that can go wrong with a shoulder. The frozen shoulder is different to others in which planes you lose the ROM and the fact that it is restricted passively and actively. It is also highly associated with metabolic disease – which I have. And my physio thinks it has something to do with a screwed-up nervous system response, too. He thinks I was predisposed because of my gender, age and thyroid disease and the ME/CFS problems then probably triggered it. I just need to get my immune system and my neurological systems to calm the heck down!

  6. By: Lednar De Nalloh Posted: March 19, 2019

    Happy birthday youngster, must be tough with your parents so far away. Nice riding out in the bush, might do some myself when it cools down around May.

    • By: The Navigator Posted: March 22, 2019

      Thanks! I haven’t been ‘home’ for my birthday since I was 18, so I’m used to them being far away then. We usually get our ‘autumn break’ around Anzac Day with fog and more rain after that. However, sometimes we get until mid-May. Last year we never got the autumn break at all. It’s still hot here – mid 30s – but we are promised a big front with rain and temps of only 22 on Tuesday. We are are all ready! We’ve only had 5mms of rain over 2 days this month so far – and the normal high temp should be 27 instead of the mid-30s! I hope you get out for a tour of some sort with the cooler weather.

  7. By: Seasidejanet Posted: March 21, 2019

    Happy Birthday Emily…..I am with you on the “body betrayal” I call all of this my “nobody ever said it would be fair” incident…..I can hear my Dad saying it to me. I’ve been dealing with doctors and tests for three months😂😂 I too have had a arm issue for a very long time….years. It was just this dull deep ache in my right bicep and at times it lost strength. I took physical therapy and really didn’t heal it…not riding Bessie with her drop bars has helped a lot…..Uptown has more of a straight bar and I started using THC/CBD oil on it. Also not working as much at the tasting room the lifting and repetition motion added to the shoulder issues….they said it generated from benith my right collarbone. It’s nearly gone. I think part of the issue for me is computer use also….on a positive note my recent thyroid biopsy came back negative!!! This is the time you want a negative response. Hang in there!!

    • By: The Navigator Posted: March 22, 2019

      I’m sorry you’ve got a bum shoulder/arm, too. You, Bill and me! Luckily, for me, I’m supposed to keep the shoulder as active as possible to keep as much range of motion as possible. So I’m not restricted in doing anything – it’s just painful… and excruciating if I go beyond a certain range. I’d hoped the medical bills were behind me for a bit. All of the car crap and medical crap has really kept my savings account in a fairly non-accumulative state for too long! Glad you’ve gotten some relief from the pain and the biopsy brought good news. It is tough to see tough women taken down 🙂

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