Arches or Arcs or Roadblocks?

I looked up the definitions of arches and arcs. I may have blurred the lines, but at least I did it from my bicycle. This route was through Seneca and Cherokee Parks in Louisville, a route I used often when we lived near there twenty some years ago. The last time I remember riding there was in 2015 when I bicycled across Indiana, the long way. I was a little more excited than usual about the ride on Thursday.

I will confess I did not take this picture today. It is my favorite of all the arched bridges in the parks and I had no access that I could shoot this scene. I’ll explain later.

Everything was going just fine and I was loving the ride, but right after the bridge above a lady and son biking the other way yelled that Cherokee Park was flooded. Oh joy! Since I’d hardly started, I decided to continue on until I saw with my own eyes that I could not get through.

No vehicles, but pedestrians and cyclists could continue if they follow some Covid protocols. This sign was not up there because of flooding. Part of the park has a circular one-way scenic route where cars get a half and peds and cyclists get the other half. They were just cutting out the vehicle traffic to give people room to social distance. I decided to carry on. I see some arcs in those signs…some may be sideways though.
Another lovely arched bridge…the water was certainly up, but so far there was no reason to turn around.
Whoops! Not being able to see how deep the water was and considering I was in sneakers that I wanted to stay dry, I decided I needed to turn back. I knew there would be no cars behind me, but turned around to see if any bikes or walkers were coming and this is what I saw!
The guy was BIG for our area! In just a few more steps, he or she was too deep to walk, so he started paddling. Yes, I need to get out of here! I think I see some arches on him or at least arcs.

I took a different route back…one that had a few big hills I’d originally planned to avoid today. It landed me where the bridge at the beginning was. The land where I usually take pictures of this bridge was flooded and the only pictures I could get were behind so many tree branches that you couldn’t see the bridge.

We’re back in the Seneca Park area and even though I saw no golfers, knowing this was a golf course, I decided it was best to stay on the road. This stone bridge is flat on top, but still has a lovely arched opening.

I needed to extend my ride…I hate washing bike shorts for a piddly amount of miles. I taught at an elementary school that I could reach safely on neighborhood streets, so I headed there.

St. Matthews Elementary School is one of the oldest of suburban schools in our large metro area. It’s a public school (in spite of its name) where the children wore uniforms. I taught kindergarten the first four years and then the computer teacher quit at the last minute. Having been a computer teacher at another school, the new principal asked me to change positions. I wasn’t thrilled, but smart enough to guess that I would have a difficult time staying in his good graces if I said no. I retired with 38 years in classrooms after my seventh year at this school. I don’t see an arch in the place, but I do just see a bit of the large horse statue over on the left.
The school had a walkway that was lined with bricks that had previous teachers’
names.
After reminiscing a bit, I got back on the bike and returned to Seneca Park where my car was waiting for me. In spite of the necessary change in plans, I had a great time. (Don’t miss that arc in my first name!)

For now, loaded touring isn’t possible due to my husband's health issues. I’m used to cycling by myself, but I can't go off and leave him. Cycle 365 has motivated me to not give up riding just because I don't have time to go as far or do awesome rides like I did in the past.

12 response to "Arches or Arcs or Roadblocks?"

  1. By: BobinVT Posted: September 4, 2020

    Looks like a great ride Laura. I really like the photo of the turtle. In that shot, he looks positively prehistoric. And by the way, really nice how the school recognizes retired teachers.

    • By: Laura Posted: September 4, 2020

      Thank you, Bob. I didn’t know until yesterday that the school stopped doing that in 2005. (I retired in 2002.) I’ll have to ask around why they stopped. It wasn’t a matter of room because there’s plenty of room left for more. I didn’t stand around looking at the thing very long, but noticed in the picture how he had a dinosaur look to that tail. PS Just realized that I misspoke. Those aren’t just teachers, but all staff members who retired during that time…custodians to principals.

  2. By: NancyG Posted: September 4, 2020

    What a nice ride to share with us. That turtle seems to be on its tallest legs to get through some puddles! Love that bridge, and your name being imbedded on the bricks at the school is mighty special.
    I would have done the same as you did riding to see for yourself if and where the flooded road might be. Adds to the adventure and you got to see that turtle.

    • By: Laura Posted: September 4, 2020

      Yes, figured on a bike it’s not that big a deal to turn around and our areas aren’t known for flash floods that I wouldn’t have time to get out safely. If there was traffic coming in the opposite direction, imagine I’d turned around sooner because riding in the middle of the road wouldn’t have been possible.

  3. By: Suzanne Posted: September 4, 2020

    What a fun adventure! Sometimes it’s just as good when things don’t go according to plan. Lovely pictures.

    • By: Laura Posted: September 4, 2020

      So true. I’ve seen some pretty interesting things in my life changing my mind or being lost.

  4. By: Scooter Posted: September 4, 2020

    Very nice, but you could have helped us out with that brick photo if you’d posted it upside down. I had to flip my iPad to get the point, but then I couldn’t read the text so well.

    Is that a snapping turtle? What a lucky shot! And I love the way the color of your bike goes so well with the floodwaters.

    • By: Laura Posted: September 4, 2020

      OK, you’ve given me my laugh for the day. Sorry for the inconvenience. 🙂 It looks like a snapper to me. We have several in Kentucky, but haven’t had time to research and find out which one he is. I should contact Turtle Man. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qBLHUm8O1Q0.

  5. By: Rich-Illinois Posted: September 4, 2020

    “Turn around, don’t drown” I guess!
    That snapper looks menacing enough to stay way away from – they bite and won’t let go till it thunders ya know. 🙂
    Nice ride despite the detours, beautiful area, sometimes serendipity pays off well.

    • By: Laura Posted: September 6, 2020

      I read they do attack people. Article said if they bite, they will most likely hang on and you’ll have less damage if you do not try to get it off yourself. I hope I don’t have to ever be someone who drives to an ER with a snapping turtle hanging onto my arm or leg.

  6. By: Bill Stone Posted: September 5, 2020

    Good heavens! I did not realize dinosaurs still roam your part of the world!

    • By: Laura Posted: September 6, 2020

      First thing I thought of when seeing him, other than being thankful he wasn’t heading toward me, were the plate-like structures on the tail. He definitely looked like his DNA may have a little dinosaur in it.

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