Cycle Days Challenge Ride #1

Beautiful morning for a ride, a bit of a chill in the air, sunshine, and calm winds

AQI of 17 — looked up the AQI for Santa Rosa, Seattle, and Spokane and found unbelievable numbers.  🙁

Question:   Does the smoke find its way inside to some degree?

A somewhat arch shaped bottle along the road

Its been a while since a corn field photo appeared

Drying out and some leaves somewhat in an arch shape

Soybeans are turning as well

The taller they grow, the more pods produced per plant  — normally 3 or 4 beans per pod

On a different topic:

Hazy gray-blue is smoke from the west coast fires

Sun blurred by the upper atmosphere smoke

Red sunset due to smoke

Very much enjoy all the entries you all have provided -- great to see the everyday cycling venues. Being in eastern Illinois, scenery certainly isn't our forte, but oh well, the roads are normally quiet. Look forward to more and more entries from all of you, I do have a few over on BL -- in Bill's Day Rides, and one journal.

5 response to "Cycle Days Challenge Ride #1"

  1. By: Laura Posted: September 14, 2020

    Wow! I would have thought it would have dissipated by the time it got there. I didn’t notice a difference here today. Will be more aware tomorrow though. (I never see too many corn fields.)

  2. By: Bill Stone Posted: September 14, 2020

    My ace support crew appreciates the corn and bean update.

    Yes, the smoke gets indoors unless you happen to live in a well-sealed place with an airlock. Not many homes are actually air-tight, and eventually you almost certainly need to open a door in order to go outside and come back in. Not as bad indoors, but not exactly fresh and sweet. For really bad air (like Greg has been experiencing), it’s a good idea to get an indoor air cleaner and set up at least one “clean room.” (Good luck getting one from Amazon any time soon.) Especially important for young kids (and brand new grand babies in the hazardous zone!!!) and anyone with breathing issues. Remember, all kinds of manmade materials burned and mixed with the wood smoke. A few days might not be too bad, but long-term exposure can result in permanent respiratory issues. Just ask folks who lived through years of serious levels of air pollution in places like Beijing and New Delhi.

    Meanwhile, please take a couple of deep breaths of sweet prairie air for me.

  3. By: The Navigator Posted: September 15, 2020

    You can certainly see the hints of autumn in those pics 🙂 My very first Christmas as a permanent Oz resident in 2001 saw a heap of bushfires in the Blue Mtns to the west of Sydney. We went to Nigel’s parent’s place for Christmas lunch and came home to find burnt leaves on our bathroom floor (no screen in that window) from the fire that was a good 20 kms away. The smoke came in that night, too. The next door neighbour taught me the cheap secret for getting rid of the smoke indoors. Fill a spray mist bottle with vinegar and spritz around. It helps the smoke ‘drop’ to the floor and gets rid of the smell. It really does work! (Not like a $350 air purifier, but….). I tape off my air-conditioner and all the outside air vents when we get smoke here. I’m asthmatic, so it bothers me more than some people, but it definitely seeps in!

  4. By: Lednar De Nalloh Posted: September 15, 2020

    Not looking forward to our bushfire season starting in January. I’ll be removing all flammable materials off the property

  5. By: Suzanne Posted: September 15, 2020

    Yes, I do see a bit of autumn in your pictures. But as long as there is sunshine and the AQI is low, all is good!

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