Summer Solstice Vermilion County, Illinois

View due east as the Summer Solstice sun’s rays angle across the lawn

(Latitude is approximately 40 degrees North)

Sun sets 23.5 degrees north of due west

At noon, the sun was 73.5 degrees above the horizon

Sun sets due west

At noon, the sun was 50 degrees above the horizon

Sun sets 23.5 degrees south of due west

At noon, the sun was 26.5 degrees above the horizon

Sun sets due west

At noon, the sun was 50 degrees above the horizon

This is the actual Solstice — good thing to take advantage of a better view 2 days earlier — or later — up to July 4th or 5th is still a fine time for a photo

So concludes a year’s worth of photos documenting the movement of the sun in a north-south direction as the Earth completes an orbit

From Space.com:

How fast does Earth orbit the sun?

Earth’s spin, of course, is not the only motion we have in space. Our orbital speed around the sun is about 67,000 mph (107,000 km/h), according to Cornell. We can calculate that with basic geometry.

First, we have to figure out how far Earth travels. Earth takes about 365 days to orbit the sun. The orbit is an ellipse, but to make the math simpler, let’s say it’s a circle. So, Earth’s orbit is the circumference of a circle. The distance from Earth to the sun — called an astronomical unit— is 92,955,807 miles (149,597,870 kilometers), according to the International Astronomers Union. That is the radius (r). The circumference of a circle is equal to 2 x π x r. So in one year, Earth travels about 584 million miles (940 million km).

Since speed is equal to the distance traveled over the time taken, Earth’s speed is calculated by dividing 584 million miles (940 million km) by­­ 365.25 days and dividing that result by 24 hours to get miles per hour or km per hour. So, Earth travels about 1.6 million miles (2.6 million km) a day, or 66,627 mph (107,226 km/h).

 

 

Very much enjoy all the entries you all have provided -- great to see the everyday cycling venues. Being in eastern Illinois, scenery certainly isn't our forte, but oh well, the roads are normally quiet. Look forward to more and more entries from all of you, I do have a few over on BL -- in Bill's Day Rides, and one journal.

8 response to "Summer Solstice Vermilion County, Illinois"

  1. By: Bill Stone Posted: June 21, 2019

    Nice series of photos, Rich.

    So, Earth travels about 1.6 million miles (2.6 million km) a day, or 66,627 mph (107,226 km/h).

    Dude, imagine if Earth had a tailwind on a downhill ride!!! 😉

    • By: Rich-Illinois Posted: June 22, 2019

      Thanks!
      Now Im Really getting the spins!!!

  2. By: Lednar De Nalloh Posted: June 22, 2019

    Well done Rich. This song below puts things in perspective.

    • By: Rich-Illinois Posted: June 22, 2019

      Thanks!
      Very good video — yes, it does put things in perspective.

  3. By: Seasidejanet Posted: June 22, 2019

    WoW….I miss those guys!! Going to look for old shows!! Oh, it told me where to find them😊😊

  4. By: gregblood Posted: June 22, 2019

    Geometry, physics and astronomy were never my thing. Words are my thing. And after reading your very scientific post, I have these profound words to say: “Oh wow! Far out, man!”

    I’m still hoping to get in on the Summer Solstice Challenge, but those darn clouds keep ruining everything. One day last week it was sunny all day and then, around 9:00 p.m. I could see clouds moving in. I was on my bike, heading to my favorite sunset vantage point and, literally, a minute before the sun reached the horizon, dark clouds completely obscured it.
    Today–sunny all morning, clouds this afternoon. Tomorrow–rain and thunderstorms all day. I might have a better chance of photographing a summer solstice lightning bolt. Oh, here are some numbers for you. My chances of getting STRUCK by lightning are probably better than getting a photo of a lightning bolt. In any given year, my odds of getting struck by lightning is 1 in 700,000. In my lifetime, my odds are about 1 in 3,000. Actually my odds might need recalculation because I do a lot of outside activities. I think those numbers would be good material for a Monty Python song.

    • By: Rich-Illinois Posted: June 22, 2019

      Welllllllll — the solstice photo was actually a couple days earlier for the exact reasons you cited.
      I did go back on the solstice, and just as the sun began to set, a bank of clouds obscured it.

      Geometry, physics, and astronomy — I just posted it, didnt say I understand it all. 😉

    • By: Lednar De Nalloh Posted: June 22, 2019

      You can film the thunderstorm, then get the frame of the lightening bolt from it, is the only way to go. If you stand on your roof holding a long metal stick your chances would go to 1 in 30, but please don’t do this.

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